How Did that Church Begin – or – WHY ARE WE HERE?

Takin_it_web

Our church, Central Assembly in El Sobrante, California began in 1953. It still exists today, some 60 years later. People gave a lot of money for a building, then expanded and relocated. Built more building space, started a school — and continued to move forward.

Literally THOUSANDS of people have been through the doors of our church and it’s ministries, one of which is a K-12 school.

I truly believe that we are still called to the primary purpose of “THE CHURCH” — and that is found in Matthew’s gospel.

[19] Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, [20] teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” (Matthew 28:19-20 ESV)

We MUST continue to get back to the basics, right? We modify, change, and introduce our programs, approach, and styles constantly. It happened in the 50’s, too, by the way. It’s an ongoing challenge for every generation, decade, and season.

When we evaluate WHAT WE “DO” at/in our churches, the question to ask is actually pretty simple. Are we STILL IN EXISTENCE to see LOST people SAVED?

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Free E-Book Offer — Good until October 6

I got this offer and downloaded it to check out for myself. It looks like a very good read, especially for those praying for our next generation who is just entering into leadership roles.

Check it out, just click on this link.

“Why do so many young adults (18 to 22) leave the church, and what will it take to bring them back? This important question is examined and duly answered in Essential Church?, a follow-up to Thom S. Rainer’s best-selling Simple Church cowritten this time with his son, research expert Sam Rainer.

The book is based on a study of one-thousand so-called “church dropouts” who were interviewed about why they left. Their answers are quite surprising, having less to do with “losing their religion” and more about the desire for a community that isn’t made stale by simply maintaining the status quo.”